On July 1 and 2, 2019, the Netherlands will be examined in Geneva by the United Nations Human Rights Committee. This UN body is tasked with supervising the compliance of one of the oldest and most important human rights treaties in the world: the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR). Each country which is a contracting party to the ICCPR is subject to periodical review by the UN Human Rights Committee. At the beginning of next week, the Dutch government must answer before the Committee for various current privacy issues that have been put on the agenda by Privacy First among others.

The previous Dutch session before the UN Human Rights Committee dates from July 2009, when the Dutch minister of Justice Ernst Hirsch Ballin had to answer for the then proposed central storage of fingerprints under the new Dutch Passport Act. This was a cause for considerable criticism of the Dutch government. Now, ten years on, the situation in the Netherlands will be examined once more. Against this background, Privacy First had submitted to the Committee a critical report (pdf) at the end of 2016, and has recently supplemented this with a new report (pdf). In a nutshell, Privacy First has brought the following current issues to the attention of the Committee:

- the limited admissibility of interest groups in class action lawsuits 

- the Dutch ban on judicial review of the constitutionality of laws

- profiling

- Automatic Number Plate Recognition (ANPR)

- border control camera system @MIGO-BORAS

- the Dutch public transport chip card ('OV-chipkaart') 

- Electronic Health Record systems

- possible reintroduction of the Telecommunications Data Retention Act

- the new Dutch Intelligence and Security Services Act (‘Tapping Law’)

- PSD2

- Passenger Name Records (PNR)

- the Dutch abolition of consultative referendums

- the Dutch non-recognition of the international prohibition of propaganda for war.

The entire Dutch session before the Committee can be watched live on UN Web TV on Monday afternoon, July 1, and Tuesday morning, July 2. In addition to privacy issues, several Dutch organizations have put numerous other human rights issues on the agenda of the Committee; click HERE for an overview, which also features the previously established List of Issues (including the new Intelligence and Security Services Act, the possible reintroduction of the retention of telecommunications data, camera system @MIGO-BORAS, and medical confidentiality with health insurance companies). The Committee will likely present its ‘Concluding Observations’ within a matter of weeks. Privacy First awaits the outcome of these observations with confidence.

Update July 26, 2019: yesterday afternoon the Committee has published its Concluding Observations on the human rights situation in the Netherlands, which includes critical opinions on two privacy issues that were brought to the attention of the Committee by Privacy First: 

The Intelligence and Security Services Act

The Committee is concerned about the Intelligence and Security Act 2017, which provides intelligence and security services with broad surveillance and interception powers, including bulk data collection. It is particularly concerned that the Act does not seem to provide for a clear definition of bulk data collection for investigation related purpose; clear grounds for extending retention periods for information collected; and effective independent safeguards against bulk data hacking. It is also concerned by the limited practical possibilities for complaining, in the absence of a comprehensive notification regime to the Dutch Oversight Board for the Intelligence and Security Services (CTIVD) (art. 17).
The State party should review the Act with a view to bringing its definitions and the powers and limits on their exercise in line with the Covenant and strengthen the independence and effectiveness of CTIVD and the Committee overseeing intelligence efforts and competences that has been established by the Act.

The Market Healthcare Act

The Committee is concerned that the Act to amend the Market Regulation (Healthcare) Act allows health insurance company medical consultants access to individual records in the electronic patient registration without obtaining a prior, informed and specific consent of the insured and that such practice has been carried out by health insurance companies for many years (art. 17).
The State party should require insurance companies to refrain from consulting individual medical records without a consent of the insured and ensure that the Bill requires health insurance companies to obtain a prior and informed consent of the insured to consult their records in the electronic patient registration and provide for an opt-out option for patients that oppose access to their records.

During the session in Geneva the abolition of the referendum and the camera system @MIGO-BORAS were also critically looked at. However, Privacy First regrets that the Committee makes no mention of these and various other current issues in its Concluding Observations. Nevertheless, the report by the Committee shows that the issue of privacy is ever higher on the agenda of the United Nations. Privacy First welcomes this development and will continue in the coming years to encourage the Committee to go down this path. Moreover, Privacy First will ensure that the Netherlands will indeed implement the various recommendations by the Committee.

The entire Dutch Session before the Committee can be watched on UN Web TV (1 July and 2 July). See also the extensive UN reports, part 1 and part 2 (pdf).

Published in Law & Politics

Tomorrow morning the Netherlands will be examined in Geneva by the highest human rights body in the world: the United Nations Human Rights Council. Since 2008, the Human Rights Council reviews the human rights situation in each UN Member State once every five years. This procedure is called the Universal Periodic Review (UPR).

Privacy First shadow report

During the previous two UPR sessions in 2008 and 2012, the Netherlands endured a fair amount of criticism. At the moment, the perspectives with regard to privacy in the Netherlands are worse than they’ve ever been before. This is reason for Privacy First to actively bring a number of issues to the attention of the UN. Privacy First did so in September 2016 (a week prior to the UN deadline), through a so-called shadow report: a report in which civil society organizations express their concerns about certain issues. (It’s worth pointing out that the Human Rights Council imposes rigorous requirements on these reports, a strict word limit being one of them.) UN diplomats rely on these reports in order to properly carry out their job. Otherwise, they would depend on one-sided State-written reports that mostly provide a far too optimistic view. So Privacy First submitted its own report about the Netherlands (pdf), which includes the following recommendations:

  • Better opportunities in the Netherlands for civil society organizations to collectively institute legal proceedings.

  • Introduction of constitutional review of laws by the Dutch judiciary.

  • Better legislation pertaining to profiling and datamining.

  • No introduction of automatic number plate recognition (ANPR) as is currently being envisaged.

  • Suspension of the unregulated border control system @MIGO-BORAS.

  • No reintroduction of large scale data retention (general Data Retention Act).

  • No mass surveillance under the new Intelligence and Security Services Act and closer judicial supervision over secret services.

  • Withdrawal of the Computer Criminality Act III , which will allow the Dutch police to hack into any ICT device.

  • A voluntary and regionally organized (instead of a national) Electronic Health Record system with privacy by design.

  • Introduction of an anonymous public transport chip card that is truly anonymous.

You can find our entire report HERE (pdf). The reports from other organizations can be found HERE.

Embassies

Privacy First did not sent its report only to the Human Rights Council but also forwarded it to all the foreign embassies in The Hague. Consequently, Privacy First had extensive (confidential) meetings in recent months with the embassies of Argentina, Australia, Bulgaria, Chili, Germany, Greece and Tanzania. The positions of our interlocutors varied from senior diplomats to ambassadors. Furthermore, Privacy First received positive reactions to its report from the embassies of Mexico, Sweden and the United Kingdom. Moreover, several passages from our report were integrated in the UN summary of the overall human rights situation in the Netherlands; click HERE ('Summary of stakeholders' information', par. 47-50).

Our efforts will hopefully prove to have been effective tomorrow. However, this cannot be guaranteed as it concerns an inter-State, diplomatic process and many issues in our report (and in recent talks) are sensitive subjects in countless other UN Member States as well.

UN Human Rights Committee

In December 2016, Privacy First submitted a similar report to the UN Human Rights Committee in Geneva. This Committee periodically reviews the compliance of the Netherlands with the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR). Partly as a result of this report, last week the Committee put the Intelligence and Security Services Act, camera system @MIGO-BORAS and the Data Retention Act among other things, on the agenda for the upcoming Dutch session in 2018 (see par. 11, 27).

We hope that our input will be used by both the UN Human Rights Council as well as the UN Human Rights Committee and that it will lead to constructive criticism and internationally exchangeable best practices.

The Dutch UPR session will take place tomorrow between 9am and 12.30pm and can be followed live online.

Update 10 May 2017: during the UPR session in Geneva today, the Dutch government delegation (led by Dutch Minister of Home Affairs Ronald Plasterk) received critical recommendations on human rights and privacy in relation to counter-terrorism by Canada, Germany, Hungary, Mexico and Russia. The entire UPR session can be viewed HERE. Publication of all recommendations by the UN Human Rights Council follows May 12th.

Update 12 May 2017: Today all recommendations to the Netherlands have been published by the UN Human Rights Council, click HERE (pdf). Useful recommendations to the Netherlands regarding the right to privacy were made by Germany, Canada, Spain, Hungary, Mexico and Russia, see paras. 5.29, 5.30, 5.113, 5.121, 5.128 & 5.129. You can find these recommendations below. Further comments by Privacy First will follow.

Extend the National Action Plan on Human Rights to cover all relevant human rights issues, including counter-terrorism, government surveillance, migration and human rights education (Germany);

Extend the National Action Plan on Human Rights, published in 2013 to cover all relevant human rights issues, including respect for human rights while countering terrorism, and ensure independent monitoring and evaluation of the Action Plan (Hungary);

Review any adopted or proposed counter-terrorism legislation, policies, or programs to provide adequate safeguards against human rights violations and minimize any possible stigmatizing effect such measures might have on certain segments of the population (Canada);

Take necessary measures to ensure that the collection and maintenance of data for criminal [investigation] purposes does not entail massive surveillance of innocent persons (Spain);

Adopt and implement specific legislation on collection, use and accumulation of meta-data and individual profiles, including in security and anti-terrorist activities, guaranteeing the right to privacy, transparency, accountability, and the right to decide on the use, correction and deletion of personal data (Mexico);

Ensure the protection of private life and prevent cases of unwarranted access of special agencies in personal information of citizens in the Internet that have no connection with any illegal actions (Russian Federation). [sic]

Update 26 May 2017: a more comprehensive UN report of the UPR session has now been published (including the 'interactive dialogue' between UN Member States and the Netherlands); click HERE (pdf). In September this year, the Dutch government will announce which recommendations it will accept and implement.

Published in Law & Politics

"Eine der wichtigsten Errungenschaften der EU ist ohne Zweifel der freie Personenverkehr. Wie frei dieser in Zukunft sein wird, ist allerdings die Frage.

Ende August gab Innenministerin Johanna Mikl-Leitner ihre Absicht bekannt, die Grenzen künftig mit computergesteuerten Kameras zu überwachen. Als Beispiel dient ein ähnliches System an den holländischen Grenzen. Laut Robert Strondl, Abteilungsleiter in der Generaldirektion für öffentliche Sicherheit, soll es demnächst eine Erkundungsmission in die Niederlande geben. „Es ist nicht die Absicht, das System eins zu eins zu übernehmen, sondern wir wollen uns die ‚Goodies' rausholen."

Proteste aus Deutschland

@migo boras heißt das System, das seit einem Jahr die wichtigsten niederländischen Grenzübergänge bewacht. Ein Computerprogramm in der Kamera registriert Kennzeichen, Typus und Passagiere der Fahrzeuge. Wenn es eine Übereinstimmung mit Polizeidaten gibt, wird das Auto angehalten. Nicht nur wegen seines Namens ruft das System Erinnerungen an Orwells Big Brother wach. Ist es Zufall, dass Big Brother auch der Name eines der erfolgreichsten niederländischen Fernsehformate ist? Wie es jetzt aussieht, dürfte @migo boras ein ähnlicher Exportschlager werden, denn auch in Großbritannien und den USA wird die Technologie inzwischen verwendet.

Unumstritten ist das Ganze allerdings nicht. Als die niederländische Regierung ihre Pläne bekannt machte, gab es massive Proteste von deutschen Datenschützern und Politikern, die meinten, dass es gegen das Schengener Abkommen verstoßen würde. Und aus diesem Grund wurde das System in einer abgeschwächten Form eingeführt. So dürfen die Kameras maximal 90 Stunden pro Monat und nicht mehr als sechs Stunden pro Tag eingeschaltet sein. (...)

Nur dumme Verbrecher

Ähnlich sieht es Vincent Böhre von der niederländischen Organisation Privacy First, die sich für den Schutz der Privatsphäre einsetzt. Gegenüber Public meint Böhre, dass nur „dumme Verbrecher" erwischt werden. „Die organisierte Kriminalität passt sich an. Die nehmen Schleichwege oder fahren statt mit rumänischen Kleinbussen mit französischen oder mit deutschen BMWs." Möglicherweise ist das System sogar kontraproduktiv: „Die Gefahr besteht, dass sich die Polizei zu sehr auf die Technik verlässt und viel Zeit verliert mit der Anhaltung von unbescholtenen Bürgern." Den Erfolg bei der Bekämpfung von illegaler Immigration sieht Böhre im Promillebereich: „Das wirft die Frage auf nach der Verhältnismäßigkeit eines Systems, das an die 20 Millionen Euro gekostet hat."

Noch bedenklicher findet er, dass juristische Grundsätze umgekehrt werden: „Früher war es so, dass die Polizei ein Auto nur anhielt, wenn es einen begründeten Verdacht auf ein Verbrechen gab. Bei @migo boras wird automatisch jedes Fahrzeug registriert und mit der Datenbank verglichen." Das Ganze erinnere laut Böhre an eine „militärische Operation". „Eines der größten Probleme des Systems ist aber, dass es keine gesetzliche Grundlage gibt, obwohl das eigentlich der Fall sein sollte bei einer Beschränkung der Privatsphäre."

Eines müssen die Kritiker aber zugeben: Zu einem großen öffentlichen Aufschrei hat @migo boras bisher nicht geführt. Abgesehen von einigen kritischen Zeitungs- und Fernsehberichten konnte die Regierung es quasi durch die Hintertür einführen. Wie bei den traditionellen holländischen Fenstern mit offenen Vorhängen, durch die jeder gleich ins Wohnzimmer blicken kann, haben die Niederländer anscheinend wenige Probleme damit, dass der Staat durch ihr Autofenster schaut. Ohne Zweifel spielt dabei eine Rolle, dass Ereignisse wie die Morde an Pim Fortuyn und dem Filmemacher Theo van Gogh das Gefühl von Sicherheit nachhaltig zerstört haben.

Keine bösartigen Regierungen

Der Journalist Bart de Koning, Autor des Buches „Alles onder controle" („Alles unter Kontrolle"), sieht aber auch tiefere Gründe: „Themen wie Bürgerrechte bekommen hier sehr wenig Aufmerksamkeit. Im Grunde genommen sind die Holländer da ziemlich naiv. Wenn man ihnen sagt, dass es um die Sicherheit geht, nehmen sie leicht eine Beschränkung der Privatsphäre in Kauf." Zu einem Teil würde dies mit der Geschichte zusammenhängen: „Während die Deutschen ihre Erfahrungen mit der Nazizeit und der Stasi gemacht haben, können sich die Holländer noch immer schwer vorstellen, dass der Staat auch bösartig sein kann." (...)

Ein Amigo an jeder Laterne

In dieser Hinsicht können sich die holländischen Datenschützer auf etwas gefasst machen. Vor kurzem kündigte Innenminister Ivo Opstelten seine Pläne an, nicht nur an den Grenzen, sondern an allen Autobahnen die Kennzeichen automatisch registrieren zu lassen und die Daten vier Wochen lang zu speichern. Für Bas Filippini, den Gründer von Privacy First, ist @migo boras nur der Anfang einer unheilvollen Entwicklung: „Ich lebe gerne in einer freien Umgebung und suche selbst meine Freunde aus ... Bald hängt aber an jeder Laterne ein Amigo, der registriert, was wir machen.""

Source: Public (magazine for Austrian municipalities), November 2013, pp. 36-37. Click HERE to read the full article online on the Public website.

"Anschlag auf Reisefreiheit: Datenschützer, EU und deutsche Polizei lehnen den niederländischen Vorstoß ab. Auch Aachen betroffen.

Den Haag. Die niederländischen Behörden wollen ab 1. Januar 2012 ihre Autobahn-Grenzen mit Video-Technik überwachen. Wer dann mit dem Auto nach Holland fährt, muss damit rechnen, dass sein Kennzeichen fotografiert und eingescannt wird. Dieses Vorgehen soll Schutz gegen illegale Einwanderer bieten, heißt es beim Migrationsministerium in Den Haag. Theoretisch, so mutmaßen niederländische Datenschützer, könnten aber auch Autofahrer abgefangen werden, die einen Strafzettel nicht bezahlt haben. In jedem Fall ist dies der nächste Anschlag auf die Reisefreiheit in Europa.

15 große Grenzübergänge nach Deutschland und Belgien sollen überwacht werden, darunter auch der Grenzübergang bei Aachen (A 4 zur A 76) sowie die A 40 Richtung Venlo. Sechs schwere Geländewagen des Grenzschutzes werden mit mobilen Erfassungsgeräten ausgestattet.

Die Macht der Rechtspopulisten

Was die Technologie wirklich kann, ist unklar. Im holländischen Innenministerium wird ausdrücklich betont, eine Speicherung von Fotos sei »erst einmal« gar nicht möglich. Bei der Stiftung Privacy First in Amsterdam sieht man das anders: »Bald ist unser Grenzschutz in der Lage, jedes Auto zu scannen«, sagte gestern ein Sprecher. Sollten die Fahndungscomputer bei einem Auto Alarm schlagen, könne es von der Autobahn-Polizei sofort gestoppt werden.

Dass das funktioniert, haben die niederländischen Behörden bereits bewiesen. Schon seit 2005 ist innerhalb des Landes das Vorgängermodell der Erfassungsgeräte gegen Schwerkriminelle im Einsatz. Trotzdem bemüht sich der Grenzschutz, das Thema herunterzuspielen: »Im Grunde tun die Kameras dasselbe wie die Kollegen, die an der Autobahn stehen und Autos herauswinken«, sagte ein Sprecher gestern.

Die EU-Kommission in Brüssel zeigt sich dennoch alarmiert und hat ein Verfahren eingeleitet. »Die Vereinbarkeit des Systems mit den Schengen-Regeln wird sehr von der praktischen Umsetzung abhängen«, sagte ein Sprecher von Innenkommissarin Cecilia Malmström. Bei der Gewerkschaft der deutschen Polizei hieß es: »Wir lehnen ein solches System ab.«

Der Vorstoß zeigt die wachsende Macht der Rechtspopulisten in Europa. Wie in Dänemark sind sie auch in Holland die treibende Kraft. Die Partei von Geert Wilders, der mit seinen Anti-Islam-Sprüchen die Gesellschaft spaltet, sitzt zwar nur in der Opposition. Ministerpräsident Mark Rutte aber braucht die Stimmen von Wilders, um überhaupt regieren zu können. In einer Art Geschäftsvertrag, der den politischen Preis für die Duldung beschreibt, wurde die Wiedereinführung scharfer Kontrollen an den Grenzen festgeschrieben."

Source: German newspaper Aachener Zeitung 23 November 2011, frontpage.

"Ab Januar erfassen die Niederlande alle Kennzeichen einreisender Autos

DEN HAAG. Ab 1. Januar 2012 wollen die niederländischen Behörden ihre Autobahn-Grenzen mit Video-Technik überwachen. Wer dann mit dem Auto nach Holland fährt, muss damit rechnen, dass sein Kennzeichen fotografiert und eingescannt wird. Eine Maßnahme zum Schutz gegen illegale Einwanderer, heißt es beim Migrationsministerium in Den Haag offiziell. Theoretisch, so mutmaßen niederländische Datenschützer, könnten aber auch Autofahrer abgefangen werden, die einen Strafzettel nicht bezahlt haben.

15 große Grenzübergänge nach Deutschland und Belgien sollen überwacht werden. Sechs Geländewagen werden mit mobilen Erfassungsgeräten ausgestattet. Was die Technologie wirklich kann, ist unklar. Im Innenministerium wird ausdrücklich betont, eine Speicherung von Fotos sei "erst einmal" gar nicht möglich. Bei der Stiftung Privacy First in Amsterdam sieht man das anders: "Bald ist unser Grenzschutz in der Lage, jedes Auto zu scannen", sagt Vincent Böhre. Sollten die Fahndungscomputer bei einem Fahrzeug Alarm schlagen, könne es sofort gestoppt werden.

Alfred Ellwanger, Sprecher des Grenzschutzes, bemüht sich das Thema herunterzuspielen: "Im Grunde tun die Kameras dasselbe wie die Kollegen, die an der Autobahn stehen und Autos herauswinken. Dabei hilft ihnen die Erfahrung, Treffer zu landen. Diese Erfahrung geben wir in Zukunft in den Computer, der dann für uns auswählt."

Die EU-Kommission zeigt sich dennoch alarmiert und hat ein Verfahren eingeleitet. "Die Vereinbarkeit des Systems mit den Schengen-Regeln wird sehr von der praktischen Umsetzung abhängen", sagte ein Sprecher von Innenkommissarin Cecilia Malmström."

Source: German newspaper General-Anzeiger (Bonn) 23 November 2011, s. 36.

"Kennzeichen einreisender Autos sollen erfasst werden

DEN HAAG. Ab 1. Januar 2012 wollen die niederländischen Behörden ihre Autobahn-Grenzen mit Video-Technik überwachen. Wer dann mit dem Auto nach Holland fährt, muss damit rechnen, dass sein Kennzeichen fotografiert und eingescannt wird. Eine Maßnahme zum Schutz gegen illegale Einwanderer, heißt es beim Migrationsministerium in Den Haag offiziell. Theoretisch, so mutmaßen niederländische Datenschützer, könnten aber auch Autofahrer abgefangen werden, die einen Strafzettel nicht bezahlt haben.

15 Übergänge sollen überwacht werden 

15 große Grenzübergänge nach Deutschland und Belgien sollen überwacht werden. Sechs Geländewagen werden mit mobilen Erfassungsgeräten ausgestattet. Was die Technologie wirklich kann, ist unklar. Im Innenministerium wird ausdrücklich betont, eine Speicherung von Fotos sei "erst einmal" gar nicht möglich. Bei der Stiftung Privacy First in Amsterdam sieht man das anders: "Bald ist unser Grenzschutz in der Lage, jedes Auto zu scannen", sagt Vincent Böhre. Sollten die Fahndungscomputer bei einem Fahrzeug Alarm schlagen, könne es sofort gestoppt werden.

Alfred Ellwanger, Sprecher des Grenzschutzes, bemüht sich das Thema herunterzuspielen: "Im Grunde tun die Kameras dasselbe wie die Kollegen, die an der Autobahn stehen und Autos herauswinken. Dabei hilft ihnen die Erfahrung, Treffer zu landen. Diese Erfahrung geben wir in Zukunft in den Computer, der dann für uns auswählt."

Die EU-Kommission hat ein Verfahren eingeleitet. "Die Vereinbarkeit des Systems mit den Schengen-Regeln wird sehr von der praktischen Umsetzung abhängen", sagte ein Sprecher von Innenkommissarin Cecilia Malmström."

Source: German newspaper Kölnische Rundschau 23 November 2011, World section, s. 32.

On Thursday morning 23 August 2012, the Dutch Royal Military and Border Police (Koninklijke Nederlandse Marechaussee, KMAR) presented to the international press the by now notorious Dutch camera system called @migo-Boras. That same afternoon the Privacy First Foundation was visited in Amsterdam by a camera crew of international news agency Associated Press (AP). For copyright reasons unfortunately we cannot publish the video material from AP. Among other things, Vincent Böhre (Privacy First) declared the following to AP:

‘‘Our main concerns are about privacy, because this system is based on profiling and total surveillance of everybody driving on the highway. Our second objection is of course the Schengen Agreement: this system really comes down to border control, even though they don’t want to call it that way. But if you look at the capabilities of the system and the intentions behind it, it’s pretty clear that it comes down to border control, and that's also what most lawyers say.’’

The news report that was then distributed across the world by AP is set out below:

‘‘Amid privacy concerns, Dutch immigration minister shows off new border cameras targeting crime’

THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — The Dutch immigration minister has shown off the government’s new system of cameras posted at border crossings with Germany and Belgium that he says will help clamp down on crimes like drug and people smuggling and illegal immigration.

However the new surveillance system has raised concerns among privacy activists.

The European Commission says that, based on information provided by Dutch authorities, the surveillance does not appear to breach the Schengen agreement governing freedom of movement within the 27-nation bloc and does not amount to a reintroduction of border controls.

However, the Commission says it will monitor the use of the cameras, which are posted at 15 highway border crossings. Immigration Minister Gerd Leers said Thursday the cameras are intended to help police target suspicious vehicles.’’
(Example: Montreal Gazette, via AP Worldstream)

Meanwhile, the Privacy First Foundation still considers taking legal action against @migo-Boras. It does so because 1) the system still has no specific legal basis, 2) the system is not necessary because it is solely 'supportive' to the task of the KMAR called Mobiel Toezicht Veiligheid (Mobile Security Monitoring) which is to check up on people from other Schengen countries travelling into the Netherlands, 3) the system is disproportionate because it is meant to track down a few individuals at the cost of the privacy and freedom to travel of everyone, 4) people are stopped and searched by the KMAR on the basis of the unlawful criterion of 'being interesting' instead of the lawful criterion of being under the 'reasonable suspicion of a criminal act', 5) the effectiveness of the system has thus far not been proved, 6) the system considers everyone at border crossings a potential suspect, 7) in practice, some elements of the system have a discriminatory effect, 8) the system seems increasingly set to be extended with four weeks of storage of everyone's travel movements through Automatic Number Plate Recognition (ANPR), 9) within the system design there is 'function creep (derogation from the original purpose) by design' instead of 'privacy by design' and 10) despite the judgement of the European Commission things basically come down to mass electronic border controls which are prohibited under the Schengen Agreement.

See also the following items (in Dutch, on privacyfirst.nl):

Big Brother-systeem zet privacy automobilist aan kant (Telegraaf.nl, 10 September 2012)

Interview met Privacy First over camerasysteem @migo-Boras (BNR Nieuwsradio, 1 August 2012)

Met @migo-Boras maak je geen vrienden (Privacy First, 5 January 2012)

Interview met Privacy First over nieuw grenscontrolesysteem @migo-boras (NOS Radio 1, 30 November 2011)

Interview met Privacy First over nieuw grenscontrolesysteem @migo-Boras (ZDF Journaal, 25 November 2011)

Click HERE for more items about @migo-Boras.

Published in CCTV

"Die Niederlande wollen ab Sommer die Kennzeichen aller einreisenden Fahrzeuge erfassen. Zumindest für 90 Stunden pro Monat.

Die Niederländer haben einigen Ehrgeiz entwickelt, wenn es darum geht zu erklären, dass ihr neues Kamera-Überwachungssystem kein Zeichen dafür ist, dass sie mit den offenen europäischen Grenzen eigentlich gar nicht so zufrieden sind. »Diese Überwachung hat nicht den Charakter früherer Grenzkontrollen«, heißt es auf der Internetseite der niederländischen Botschaft in Berlin. Es gehe einzig darum, Menschenschmuggel, Menschenhandel und Geldwäsche zu verhindern, sagt Gerd Leers, Minister für Einwanderung und Asyl, unter dessen Federführung das Projekt läuft.

Niemand sollte etwas merken

Erklärungen das Ministeriums zum Kamera-Überwachungssystem lesen sich meist wie Rechtfertigungen, und weil man damit gerechnet hat, dass die Maßnahme auf einigen Widerstand treffen wird, sollte sie so eingeführt werden, dass möglichst Wenige etwas davon mitbekommen. Erst als niederländische Medien nachfragten, welchen Zweck die von ihnen entdeckten Kameras an einer Grenzen im Norden des Landes erfüllen, wurde das Projekt öffentlich.

Mittlerweile allerdings ist es für jeden offensichtlich, der über die Autobahn oder eine Nationalstraße in die Niederlande fährt. So zum Beispiel am Grenzübergang Vetschau, wo die A4 in die A76 mündet, in Höhe von Bocholtz. An einem Stahlträger über den Fahrbahnen sind mehrere Kameras in­stalliert. Noch seien sie nicht in Betrieb, sagt René Claessen, Sprecher der Koninklijke Marechaussee (niederländische Nationalpolizei) auf Anfrage unserer Zeitung, die Geräte befänden sich in der Probephase. »Die Kameras werden erst kurz vor dem Sommer aktiviert«, sagt Claessen. Zum Einsatz kommen sie an den 15 meist frequentierten Grenzübergängen. Fünf davon teilen sich die Niederlande mit Belgien, zehn mit Deutschland, die meisten liegen in NRW. Daneben ist geplant, weitere sechs mobile Kameras einzusetzen.

Nach Angaben des Ministeriums wird von allen vorbeifahrenden Fahrzeugen Vorderseite und Nummernschild fotografiert. Die gewonnenen Daten gehen an die Koninklijke Marechaussee, die sie mit eingespeicherten Risikoprofilen abgleicht. Bei einem Treffer wird das Fahrzeug angehalten.

»Umkehrung des Rechtssystems«

Niederländische Datenschützer kritisieren die Grenzüberwachung, die Stiftung »Privacy First« etwa spricht von einem »enormen Eingriff in die Privatsphäre«. Alle Fahrzeuge zu kontrollieren, um etwas Verdächtiges zu finden, sei eine »Umkehrung des Rechtssystems«. Auf einer von niederländischen Datenschützern betriebenen Internetseite (www.sargasso.nl) heißt es, dass die Nationalpolizei durch die Kameras die Möglichkeit bekomme, die Daten einreisender Fahrzeuge mit »allerlei schwarzen Listen abzugleichen«.

Minister Leers widerspricht dem. Die gewonnenen Daten würden übrigens auch nicht gespeichert. Die Kameras registrierten wohl, aus welchem Land ein Fahrzeug komme. Aber das könnte die Nationalpolizei ja jetzt auch schon feststellen, sagt Leers.

Nachdem Deutschland aus Sorge um den freien Verkehr zwischen den Mitgliedsstaaten bei der Europäischen Kommission Klage eingereicht hat, wartet diese auf mehr Informationen aus den Niederlanden. Leers kündigte an, er werde darauf hinweisen, dass die Kameras nicht gegen Datenschutz- oder Grenzkontrollbestimmungen verstießen. Zudem sollen sie höchstens 90 Stunden pro Monat Aufnahmen machen - von permanenter Grenzkontrolle könne keine Rede sein."

Source: Aachener Zeitung 24 January 2012, p. 5.

In November 2011, a German ZDF Television crew visited Privacy First for a quick interview about the new Dutch border surveillance system @MIGO-BORAS. Below is the item from ZDF Heute evening news:

"Mit einem Kamerasystem sollen an der niederländischen Grenze einreisende Autos kontrolliert werden. Kritik an der Überwachung üben sowohl Datenschützer als auch die EU-Kommission.

Wenn eine reflexartige Verteidigungshaltung ein Anzeichen für Nervosität ist, dann ist man dieser Tage wohl ziemlich nervös im niederlän­dischen Immigrationsministerium. Ein Sprecher des Ministers Gerd Leers ließ jedenfalls wissen, dass selbstverständlich »alles ordentlich geregelt« sei beim neuen Hightech-Großprojekt seines Hauses. Dabei hatte die Jungle World lediglich nach dem genauen Betriebsbeginn für das automatische Kamerasystem gefragt, das an 15 Autobahngrenzübergängen in Richtung Belgien und Deutschland installiert wurde und demnächst einreisende Fahrzeuge frontal fotografieren soll.

Über das Datum der Inbetriebnahme will das Ministerium derzeit keine näheren Angaben machen. Bekannt ist hingegen, dass die Kennzeichen mit Hilfe der Technologie »Automatic Number Plate Recognition« gelesen werden. Anfang Januar erklärte Minister Leers im TV- Magazin Eén Vandaag deren Funktionsweise: Überquert ein Fahrzeug mit verdächtigem Nummernschild die Grenze, »gibt das System einen ›Piepton‹ von sich, so dass der Grenzschutz weiß, hier kann etwas vorliegen«. Es würden »nur Verkehrsströme« analysiert, um »illegale Aktivitäten« zu verhindern, aber weder Kennzeichen noch persönliche Daten gespeichert, beteuerte der Christdemokrat.
(...)
Datenschützer überzeugt das nicht. Die Stiftung Privacy First spricht von einem »enormen Eingriff in die Privatsphäre«. Ein solcher sei nur bei konkretem Verdacht einer strafbaren Handlung zu rechtfertigen, sagt Stiftungsdirektor Vincent Böhre. Alle Fahrzeuge zu kontrollieren, um bei irgendeiner Person etwas Verdächtiges zu finden, sei dagegen eine »Umkehrung des Rechtssystems«. Privacy First befürchtet, die gewonnenen Daten könnten je nach Bedarf mit schwarzen Listen der Polizei, der Staatsanwaltschaft oder des Geheimdienstes verglichen werden.

Die Regierung bestreitet diese Absichten. Doch birgt »Amigo-Boras« noch immer die Gefahr des function creep, also der Benutzung der Technologie zu anderen Zwecken als dem ursprünglich vorgesehenen. Wie naheliegend dies im Fall der Grenzkameras ist, zeigt ein Blick auf ein aktuelles Gesetzesvorhaben. Demnach sollen künftig alle mit Kameras ermittelten Kennzeichen, beispeilsweise entlang der Autobahnen, zusammen mit Angaben über Zeitpunkt und Ort der Aufnahme vier Wochen lang gespeichert werden können. Bislang ging das nur, wenn ein bestimmtes Nummernschild im Rahmen polizeilicher Ermittlungen verdächtig war.

Der Journalist Dimitri Tokmetzis, verantwortlich für die Website sargasso.nl, die sich mit Fragen des Datenschutzes befasst, spricht von einer »de facto hundertprozentigen Kontrolle«. Dies verstoße gegen das Schengen-Abkommen. Kritisch äußert er sich auch über den Versuch, ein zukünftiges Verhalten durch die Erstellung eines bestimmten Profils vorhersagen zu wollen. Anhand ihres Nummernschildes würden Menschen mit Hilfe von anderen Kennzeichen wie Autotyp, Zeitpunkt und Häufigkeit des Grenzübertritts kategorisiert. Sowohl seitens der Regierung als auch der Medien wurde in diesem Zusammenhang mehrfach das Bild eines Kleinbusses bemüht, in dem osteuropäische Menschenschmuggler angeblich häufig einreisen.

Inzwischen interessiert sich auch die EU-Kommission für »Amigo-Boras«. Nachdem die deutsche Regierung aus Sorge um den freien Verkehr zwischen den Mitgliedsstaaten eine Klage in Brüssel eingereicht hatte, wurde Cecilia Malmström aktiv. Die EU-Kommisarin für Innenpolitik wandte sich im November mit der Bitte um mehr Informationen an die niederländische Regierung, um sicherzustellen, dass das Schengen-Abkommen durch die Pläne nicht verletzt werde. Zu Jahresbeginn sagte Malmströms Sprecher Michele ­Cercone, das weitere Vorgehen hänge von der Antwort der niederländischen Regierung ab. Laut Minister Leers sei diese Anfang des Jahres zu erwarten. Bis Mitte Januar lag sie noch nicht vor.
(...)
Bereits seit 2005 wird an den Grenzkameras gearbeitet. Die Regierung der Niederlande bemüht sich, Bedenken zu zerstreuen. Nach dem Schreiben Malmströms sagte Minister Leers, die Kameraüberwachung verstoße keinesfalls gegen das Schengen-Abkommen. Beabsichtigt seien nur Stichproben, weshalb die Kameras pro Grenzübergang nicht länger als 90 Stunden monatlich zum Einsatz kämen. Das tägliche Limit soll bei sechs Stunden liegen. Wie eine solche Beschränkung gewährleistet werden soll, sagte der Minister nicht. Vorläufig ist die für Januar geplante Einführung des Grenzüberwachungssystems auf kommenden Sommer verschoben worden. Bis dahin stehe eine »verlängerte Testphase« an. Mit den Mahnungen aus Brüssel, heißt es im Ministerium, habe die Verzögerung aber nichts zu tun. Vielmehr steckten »operationelle Gründe« dahinter."

Read the entire article in German weekly Jungle World HERE, or click HERE for an 'English version' in Google Translate.

Page 1 of 2

Our Partners

logo Voys Privacyfirst
logo greenhost
logo platfrm
logo AKBA
logo boekx
logo brandeis
 
 
 
banner ned 1024px1
logo demomedia
 
 
 
 
 
Pro Bono Connect logo
Procis

Follow us on Twitter

twitter icon

Follow our RSS-feed

rss icon

Follow us on LinkedIn

linked in icon

Follow us on Facebook

facebook icon