Privacy First has had a turbulent year. At the start of 2018, we organized the Dutch Privacy Awards and they were a great success. Soon this event will take place again. The greatest success of the year, however, was the referendum against the new Dutch Intelligence and Security Services Act (better known as the Tapping Law), which was won by the initiators and their many supporters. Subsequently however, the Dutch government decided to ruthlessly abolish the referendum and Privacy First and others unfortunately were not in a position to prevent the Tapping Law from entering into force almost unaltered. Unless the Dutch government and the House of Representatives decide to thoroughly overhaul the Act, a large scale new lawsuit to challenge it will be on the cards.

Positive developments

In terms of organization, the year has been marked mostly by positive developments. Since the summer, we have a new board of directors, a new advisory board and a new and relatively cheap (small) office on an excellent location. We have switched to privacy-friendly telecom provider Voys. Increasingly, Privacy First is approached by public authorities and companies to cooperate on privacy projects, for example with regard to the infamous European payments directive PSD2, which will soon enter into force in the Netherlands. In addition, Privacy First almost continuously pursues political lobbying and quiet diplomacy. Earlier this year, we’ve lobbied successfully with the Dutch State Commission on the Parliamentary System for the introduction of a binding referendum and a Constitutional Court. Moreover, we’ve made our critical voice heard with regard to the possible introduction of Passenger Name Records (PNR) in aviation and Taser weapons among the Dutch police force. After all, privacy is a broad term and is about much more than data protection only.

However, history has taught us that sustainable privacy protection usually requires legal action at a national or European level. That’s why Privacy First also pursues litigation. Those who’ve been acquainted with us for some time, know that when Privacy First starts legal proceedings, something is really going on - something, to be precise, which isn’t for the better. As soon as large scale privacy violations are imminent, it’s time for Privacy First to step in. This is one such moment. Your support of our operations is indispensable.

Case against ANPR Act

In recent years, Privacy First has regularly warned against the introduction of a new draconian Dutch law which allows for the continuous storage of data relating to travel movements of millions of motorists for four weeks in a central police database, regardless of whether or not these motorists are suspected of any wrongdoing. This is the Automatic Number Plate Recognition Act (ANPR). At the end of 2017, the Dutch Senate adopted this Act, after which Privacy First announced it would initiate legal proceedings. Subsequently, Privacy First had a meeting with the Dutch State Attorney, which was followed by a prolonged silence. Today however, the Dutch government announced it will introduce the ANPR Act as per 1 January 2019. Therefore, Privacy First is currently preparing interim injunction proceedings in order to render this Act inoperative on account of violation of the right to privacy. If necessary, these proceedings will be followed by proceedings which are broader in scope and will deal with the merits of the case. Indeed, this Act is a massive breach of privacy for which there is simply no place in a free and democratic constitutional State. Through Pro Bono Connect, Privacy First has hired law firm CMS to carry out proceedings on our behalf. Ideally, this would happen in coalition with other relevant organizations.

Urgent call for donations

Due to unexpected fundraising setbacks, at present Privacy First urgently needs financial support, including your support as a (potential) donor. The more support we get, the more thorough and therefore the more effective we will be able to conduct these legal proceedings and the more likely it will be we will come out victorious. Would you like to support Privacy First? Donating is very easy on the dedicated page on our website. Otherwise, please donate directly to account number NL95ABNA0495527521 (BIC: ABNANL2A) in the name of Stichting Privacy First in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, stating ‘donation’. Privacy First is recognized by the Dutch Tax and Customs Administration as an Institution for General Benefit (ANBI). Therefore your donations are tax-deductible.

In recent years, Privacy First has had a lot of positive influence thanks to your support. We hope to be able to count on you once again!

Privacy First wishes you happy holidays and a privacy-friendly 2019!

Published in Litigation
Tuesday, 02 October 2018 20:47

Advisory Board

The Advisory Board of the Privacy First Foundation consists of the following persons, in their personal capacity:

- Hans Franken (Professor emeritus of Information Law, Leiden University)

- Quirine Eijkman (Vice Chairman of the Netherlands Institute for Human Rights & Lecturer in Access to Justice, Utrecht University of Applied Sciences)

- Wilmar Hendriks (Privacy professional & Executive coach, Control Privacy)

- Eva de Leede (Senior policy officer in the field of Energy, Dutch Ministry of Economic Affairs and Climate Policy)

- Joris Sprakel (Lawyer in the field of socio-economic human rights, Fischer Groep & Lecturer in Human Rights Law, The Hague University of Applied Sciences).

Published in Advisory Board
Wednesday, 25 July 2018 21:27

Board

The Board of the Privacy First Foundation consists of the following persons:

- Bas Filippini (founder and chairman)

- Paul Korremans (treasurer)

- Marc Smits (secretary)

- Ancilla van de Leest (general board member).

Published in Board
Tuesday, 28 February 2017 12:38

Esther Gruppen, Political advisor

Esther Gruppen, Political advisor

Esther Gruppen studied Political Science at Radboud University Nijmegen. During her Master’s specialization she developed a keen interest in themes such as technology, civil rights and ethics. Against this background she now contributes to Privacy First as a political advisor, researching and reporting on the political side of privacy issues.

Major technological advances involve many opportunities and possibilities, but also challenges concerning civil rights like privacy. Esther is aware of the increased power of companies and governments due to the use of ‘Big Data’. The challenge for the legislative branch is to deal with this power in a responsible way in order to ensure everyone’s personal freedom.

Published in Organisation
Sunday, 12 December 2010 19:04

Martijn van der Veen, Project leader

Martijn van der Veen, Project leader

Martijn van der Veen fullfills a project management role within Privacy First. Before, he fullfilled a pioneering role by raising Privacy First Solutions. With this initiative the Foundation aimed to address the business market. Martijn is the founder and owner of Procis, a network organization and consultancy firm specialized in privacy issues, ranging from Privacy Impact Assessments (PIAs) to the implementation of organizational changes. Having studied Public Administration at the University of Twente, throughout his career he has been active within civil society organizations and has worked on projects for the Dutch police, the Dutch Ministry of Security and Justice and other governments, both at national as well as municipal level.

Today, the handling of personal data and the integrity of information processing are among the bigger challenges faced by organizations and governments. In Martijn's vision it is possible to both achieve (policy) goals as well as to safeguard privacy. By committing himself to Privacy First as our project leader, he contributes to the necessary checks & balances within a democratic constitutional State.

Published in Organisation

Since we are a foundation that has privacy very high on its agenda, it is only natural for us to make use of a privacy-friendly hosting service for our website. Therefore the websites of Privacy First (privacyfirst.nl and privacyfirst.eu) are hosted on the servers of Greenhost in Amsterdam since this month. This decision was preceded by a thorough exploration of foreign alternatives, varying from hosting services inside a nuclear bunker in Sweden to VPN tunnels in Switzerland and an old fortress in the North Sea. However, Greenhost proved to be well ahead of its foreign competitors in terms of customer-friendliness, rapid response, sustainability and low costs for reliable and secure hosting, including Privacy by Design. Even the physical location is an advantage: Greenhost is situated in Amsterdam just a few hundred metres from the Privacy First office. Moreover, Greenhost has been a trustworthy partner of a number of NGOs, including Bits of Freedom. For Privacy First however, the decisive aspect was the fact that Greenhost has for years taken up an exemplary role of privacy pioneer, whereas many other ICT companies lagged behind in this respect. In 2009 Greenhost stopped logging email data and called for other companies to do the same. At the beginning of 2011 Greenhost wrote a manual for the security of internet traffic: the Basic Internet Security Manual. These initiatives not only reflect audacity and leadership, but also corporate social responsibility in the sense of privacy-friendly entrepreneurship. In that regard Greenhost and Privacy First have a shared vision on society. Therefore Privacy First looks forward with great confidence to the cooperation with Greenhost in the years to come!

Published in Online Privacy
Tuesday, 14 December 2010 16:45

Vincent Böhre, Director and Legal advisor

Vincent Böhre, Director and Legal advisor 

Vincent Böhre studied International and European Law as well as Dutch Law at the University of Amsterdam. During his studies he worked as a researcher at the law firm Loyens & Loeff. He then worked at Amnesty International and was commissioned by the Scientific Council for Government Policy (WRR) to conduct a study into the Dutch biometric passport. In the field of the right to privacy and data protection, he has been active for several years at the Netherlands Committee of Jurists for Human Rights (NJCM). From 2010 - 2013 he was also chairman of the Dutch Platform for the Protection of Civil Rights (Platform Bescherming Burgerrechten).

Published in Organisation
Wednesday, 15 December 2010 03:53

Bas Filippini, Founder and Chairman

Bas Filippini, Founder and Chairman 

Bas Filippini can look back on an entrepreneurial career in business, after having been employed in a management capacity by KPN Telecom. In 1997 he founded his own company in Amsterdam called Tele'Train. Currently, he is an investor in various companies and develops several projects of his own.

Out of personal interest, he has followed various training programs in personal development and has done some studies in that field. To him, personal freedom and integrity are the most valuable things an individual can have. These aspects and his own experience in personal development have shaped him, both in private as well as in business.

As a personal contribution to society he therefore took the initiative to found the Privacy First Foundation.

 

Published in Organisation

Our Partners

logo Voys Privacyfirst
logo greenhost
logo platfrm
logo AKBA
logo boekx
logo brandeis
 
 
 
banner ned 1024px1
logo demomedia
 
 
 
 
 
Pro Bono Connect logo
Procis

Follow us on Twitter

twitter icon

Follow our RSS-feed

rss icon

Follow us on LinkedIn

linked in icon

Follow us on Facebook

facebook icon