In the context of the National Privacy Conference organized by Privacy First and the Dutch Platform for the Information Society (ECP), today the Dutch Privacy Awards have been handed out. These Awards offer a podium to organizations that consider privacy as an opportunity to positively distinguish themselves and want privacy-friendly entrepreneurship and innovation to become a benchmark. The winners of the 2020 Dutch Privacy Awards are Publicroam, NUTS and Candle.

Winner: Publicroam

Safe and easy access to WiFi everywhere for guest users

Most people in libraries, hotels, coffee bars and other public places log onto the local WiFi network in order to save on mobile data and to not rely on mobile networks which indoors may not be available everywhere. Often, WiFi networks operate on the basis of a single, local password, indicated on tables and screens. This makes the digital activities of users vulnerable in more ways than one, with all the ensuing nasty consequences. On top of that, users may not be informed about what the internet provider does with their personal data. It is said that the trade in personal data is by now more profitable than the trade in oil.

These risks were first identified by educational institutions and later by public authorities. This led to the creation of international roaming services like Eduroam and Govroam. But why aren’t such services available everywhere and to everyone? Publicroam set out to change just that and is being welcomed in more and more places. And rightfully so, according to the Privacy Awards expert panel. Several large municipalities and organizations (all libraries in the Netherlands among them) are already connected to Publicroam, or will be soon. In and of itself this facility is not a completely new solution, but the expert panel is particularly impressed by the fact that it can offer great advantages to literally everyone in the country – and possibly beyond – and can therefore have a huge impact on what we’re used to: one account which allows all users to go online automatically and securely, with serious respect for privacy ensured.

It’s possible after all: sound business initiatives that respect privacy; Publicroam is proof of this.

Winner: NUTS

Decentral infrastructure for privacy-friendly communication in healthcare

The NUTS Foundation is an initiative which aims to offer a privacy-friendly solution to identity management and sharing personal data in healthcare environments. It entails that individuals keep control over which healthcare data may be shared between healthcare providers. The NUTS Foundation has laid down its principles in a manifesto which all participants should ascribe to and which states that all software that’s being developed should meet the demands of open source. The result that the NUTS Foundation is striving for is a decentral system which keeps control over personal health information in the hands of the people involved.

The services offered by the decentral network are based on the principles of privacy by design. Identity management solutions contribute to irrefutably establishing the identity of individuals concerned. The decentral approach is in line with the digital healthcare architecture which is currently in the making and is also partly being introduced already. In this way, healthcare information components can use the decentral facilities that are being realized through NUTS.

In the eyes of the expert panel, the NUTS Foundation is a strong example of an initiative which not only looks at privacy issues in a comprehensive way but creates concrete solutions to these issues as well. The open source community that the NUTS Foundation is bringing to fruition, prevents vendor-lock-in in crucial areas of the digital healthcare infrastructure. Emerging digital Personal Healthcare Areas can equally make use of the decentral administrative provisions which NUTS is working towards. The rationale behind NUTS – creating a utility for a crucial part of the digital healthcare architecture – particularly appeals to the expert panel. Expanding the foundation, which currently by and large relies on a single company, will further increase the support for this initiative.

In order to give the NUTS Foundation the opportunity to further realize its ideals and to propagate these more widely, the expert panel has decided to confer this year’s Dutch Privacy Award for business solutions to the NUTS Foundation.

Winner: Candle

Privacy-friendly smart home solution

Candle is a reaction to a risk analysis (privacy by design) to Internet of Things products which unnecessarily connect to a cloud server. It’s a project which concentrates on developing alternative smart systems in and around the home, based on the principle that connection to the internet is unnecessary. Candle started off as a project organization run by students from universities and colleges of higher education as well as by artists’ collectives who aimed at developing practical hardware solutions combined with open source software. Various domestic appliances such as central heating, cameras, CO2 sensors and other applications can easily be connected with one another. A switch is used to make contact with an external network. Users make a deliberate choice when they import and export emails and other data.

Candle shows that it’s very well feasible to create a Smart solution without Big Tech companies and their data driven models. Meanwhile, there are various concept solutions which companies can actually put into practice. In its core, Candle is privacy by design and it opens people’s eyes to alternative smart systems.

"The market for ethical technology will grow in much the same way as the market for biological food has grown enormously. But how do we boost this market? That’s the challenge. The GDPR has ploughed the earth. Now it’s time to sow and entrust this concept to consumers", comments Candle.

Nominations

There are four categories in which applicants are awarded:

1. the category of Consumer solutions (business-to-consumer)

2. the category of Business solutions (within a company or business-to-business)

3. the category of Public services (public authority-to-citizen)

4. The incentive prize for a ground breaking technology or person.

From the various entries, the independent expert panel chose the following nominees per category:

Consumer solutions: Business solutions: Public services:
Publicroam NUTS (no entries)
Candle Rabobank/Deloitte  
Skotty    

During the National Privacy Conference the nominees presented their projects to the audience in Award pitches. Thereafter, the Awards were handed out. Click HERE for the entire expert panel report (pdf), which includes participation criteria and explanatory notes on all the nominees and winners.

National Privacy Conference

The National Privacy Conference is a ECP|Platform for the Information Society and Privacy First initiative. Once a year, the conference brings together Dutch industry, public authorities, the academic community and civil society with the aim to build a privacy-friendly information society. The mission of both the National Privacy Conference and Privacy First is to turn the Netherlands into a guiding nation in the field of privacy. To this end, privacy by design is key.

These were the speakers during the 2020 National Privacy Conference in successive order:

- Monique Verdier (vice chairman of Dutch Data Protection Authority)
- Richard van Hooijdonk (trendwatcher/futurist) and Bas Filippini (founder and chairman of Privacy First)
- Tom Vreeburg (IT-auditor)
- Coen Steenhuisen (privacy advisor at Privacy Company)
- Peter Fleischer (global privacy counsel at Google)
- Sander Klous (professor in Big Data Eco Systems, University of Amsterdam)
- Kees Verhoeven (Member of the Dutch House of Representatives for D66).

Expert panel of the Dutch Privacy Awards

The independent expert award panel consists of privacy experts from different fields:

• Bas Filippini, founder and chairman of Privacy First
• Paul Korremans, partner at Comfort Information Architects and Privacy First board member
• Marie-José Bonthuis, owner of IT’s Privacy
• Esther Janssen, attorney at Brandeis Attorneys specialized in information law and fundamental rights
• Marc van Lieshout, managing director at iHub, Radboud University Nijmegen
• Melanie Rieback, CEO and co-founder of Radically Open Security
• Nico Mookhoek, privacy lawyer and owner of NMLA
• Wilmar Hendriks, founder of Control Privacy and member of the Privacy First advisory board
• Alex Commandeur, senior advisor at BMC Advies.

In order to make sure that the award process is run objectively, the panel members may not judge on any entry of his or her own organization.

Privacy First organizes the Dutch Privacy Awards with the support of the Democracy & Media Foundation and in collaboration with ECP. Would you like to become a partner of the Dutch Privacy Awards? Then please contact Privacy First!

 

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PSD2 opt-out register

Is it possible to have innovation in the field of payment data while preserving privacy? Under the new European banking law PSD2, payment data can be shared with non banking parties. The legislator has, however, failed to implement privacy by design. Therefore, the Privacy First Foundation has taken the initiative to launch a PSD2 opt-out register in the Netherlands. We are happy to report that the SIDN Fund is supporting us in this. With this opt-out register bank account numbers can be filtered. This can be useful in case bank account numbers are linked to sensitive personal data, such as a payment to a trade union, a healthcare insurer, a political party or an organization that reveals one’s sexual preference. It can also be useful when consumers wish to filter their contra accounts. The Dutch PSD2 opt-out register could become trendsetting at a European level.

Source: https://www.sidnfonds.nl/nieuws/de-eerste-pioniers-van-2019, 22 May 2019 (in Dutch).

Follow https://psd2meniet.nl for updates and become a member of our PSD2 Privacy Panel! (in Dutch)


For all its projects and affiliated activities, Privacy First is largely dependent on donations. The more financial support and donations we receive, the sooner Privacy First will be able to launch the PSD2 opt-out register.

In the context of the National Privacy Conference organized by Privacy First and ECP today the Dutch Privacy Awards have been handed out. These Awards offer a podium to organisations that consider privacy as an opportunity to positively distinguish themselves and want privacy-friendly entrepreneurship and innovation to become a benchmark. The winners of the 2019 Dutch Privacy Awards are Startpage.com as well as Privacy Company & SURF. PublicSpaces received the incentive prize.

Winner: Startpage.com

With Private Search 2.0, Startpage.com allows those who find profiling and targeting on the basis of search queries oppressing, to breathe a little more freely again. The basic promise of Startpage is that its users can question Google Search without having to fear that Google accords a permanent data trail to every single query. Moreover, Startpage.com enables searching through an anonymizing proxy. It therefore meets the needs of anyone who doesn’t want to be confronted with targeted ads on the basis of search queries. Think of people who search for information related to financial, relationship or health problems. And naturally any other person who, by default, wishes to stay clear of foreign companies that trade in personal data (based in Silicon Valley and elsewhere). Startpage.com thus offers people an important and very privacy-friendly opportunity to visit websites without having to worry about unwanted profiling and without being confronted with one’s own search behavior.

Winner: Privacy Designer (Privacy Company and SURF)

Privacy Designer is a Privacy Company and SURF web app which helps SMEs, associations and NGOs to identify privacy risks. The app has been co-financed by the SIDN Fund and can be used free of charge.

The expert panel was deeply impressed by this solution. It’s a practical and innovative app which has a large impact on society because research points out that the target group is often insufficiently aware of the privacy risks to which it is exposed and doesn’t quite know how to deal with such risks appropriately. Another advantage of Privacy Designer is the fact that all data is stored on one’s own device and the use of personal data is kept to a minimum. In short, this entry can potentially improve the privacy of a large group of people in an effective and accessible way.

Winner: PublicSpaces

There is a lot that goes on online that internet users can’t see and are not aware of. Advertising displayed on the basis of search behavior can be a great annoyance. Meanwhile, we become increasingly dependent on online information gathering, navigation and cloud storage. This makes a few dominant commercial companies ever more powerful.

PublicSpaces is a coalition of public broadcasters and cultural organizations that aim to ‘repair’ the internet by restoring it to a community of users. They try to do so by collaborating with a number of relevant parties and by offering alternatives. In particular, the fact that data so easily ends up across different platforms is a thorn in the eye of PublicSpaces. With open source initiatives and the use of IRMA (‘I Reveal my Attributes’, an open source identity platform which won a Dutch Privacy Award last year), the coalition attempts to improve online privacy. The expert panel wholeheartedly encourages PublicSpaces’ mission.

Nominations

There are four categories in which applicants are awarded:

1. the category of Consumer solutions (business-to-consumer)

2. the category of Business solutions (within a company or business-to-business)

3. the category of Public services (public authority-to-citizen)

4. The incentive prize for a ground breaking technology or person.

From the various entries, the independent expert panel chose the following nominees per category:

Consumer solutions: Business solutions: Public services:
Private Search 2.0 (Startpage.com)

Privacy op Schooltas  

Passantentellingen (Municipality of Nijmegen)

VraagApp Privacy Designer (Privacy Company and SURF) Project privacy by design (Dutch Tax Authorities)
Schluss    

During the Dutch National Privacy Conference the nominees presented their projects to the audience in Award pitches. Thereafter, the Awards were handed out. Click HERE for the entire expert panel report (Dutch pdf), which includes participation criteria and explanatory notes on all the nominees and winners.

winnaars Awards 28jan2019

National Privacy Conference

The National Privacy Conference is a ECP|Platform for the Information Society and Privacy First initiative. Once a year, this conference brings together Dutch industry, public authorities, the academic community and civil society with the aim to build a privacy-friendly information society. The mission of both the National Privacy Conference and Privacy First is to turn the Netherlands into a guiding nation in the field of privacy and data protection. To this end, privacy by design is key.

These were the speakers during the 2019 National Privacy Conference in successive order:

Aleid Wolfsen (chairman of the Dutch Data Protection Authority)
Sophie in ‘t Veld (Member of the European Parliament)
Tijmen Schep (PrivacyLabel)
Brenno de Winter (IT researcher)
Jeroen Terstegge (Privacy Management Partners).

Expert panel of the Dutch Privacy Awards

The independent expert Award panel consists of privacy experts from different fields:

  • Bart van der Sloot, senior researcher at Tilburg University (panel chairman)
  • Bas Filippini, founder and chairman of Privacy First
  • Paul Korremans, data protection & security professional at Comfort Information Architects (and Privacy First board member)
  • Marie-José Bonthuis, IT’s Privacy owner
  • Esther Janssen, attorney specialized in information law and fundamental rights, Brandeis Attorneys
  • Esther Keymolen, philosopher of technology, TILT, Tilburg University
  • Matthijs Koot, senior security specialist, Secura BV
  • Marc van Lieshout, senior researcher at TNO and managing director at PI.lab
  • Wendeline Sjouwerman, privacy specialist who focuses on local governments and health care.

In order to make sure that the Award process is run objectively, the panel may not judge on any entry of his or her own organization.

Privacy First organizes the Dutch Privacy Awards with the support of the Democracy & Media Foundation and in collaboration with ECP. Would you like to become a partner or sponsor of the Dutch Privacy Awards? Then please contact Privacy First!

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Published in Actions

New European PSD2 legislation in force

At the start of 2019, the Payment Service Directive 2 will enter into force in the Netherlands. Under this new European banking law, consumers can share their banking details with parties other than their own bank. This first requires their explicit consent, upon which banks must share all transactional data[1] of the consumer (account holder) with an external party (financial service provider) for a period of 90 days, after which the consumer can renew his consent. The consumer can also withdraw his consent at all times.

PSD2 is a great concern to Privacy First

Privacy First is very worried about PSD2. The law focuses too much on improving competition and innovation while the privacy interest of account holders is overlooked. These are Privacy First’s greatest concerns:

  • Consumers are not in a position to limit the amount of banking details. Even in case a financial service provider does not need these details, all data are shared just the same once the account holder has issued his consent.
  • The bank details of a consumer include the details of contra accounts. Holders of such accounts are unaware of the fact that their details may be shared and are not in a position to prevent that. As transactional data will be analyzed much more widely with the use of Big Data and data analyses than before the introduction of PSD2, there will be a much greater risk of privacy violations.
  • Banking details contain ‘sensitive personal data’ that may only be issued under strict conditions.[2] A subscription payment to a trade union, political party or organization that reveals one’s sexual preferences, should be considered sensitive personal data according to Privacy First. The same applies to transactions with health insurance companies and pharmacists. Currently, there is no way to filter out these data and they are being issued to parties that are not allowed to process them.

During an episode of the Dutch television program Radar that was broadcast on Monday 7 January 2019, Privacy First drew particular attention to these issues.

PSD2 quality label aims for transparency

Privacy First wants consumers to get honest and transparent information on what happens to their data. We advocate not for lengthy privacy statements, but rather for information that fits on a single sheet of paper. This information should not come from the financial industry, but from consumers themselves. After all, they can best decide which information they find valuable when making a choice. During 2018, Privacy First worked on this initiative along with the Volksbank and other partners from the financial sector.

PSD2 opt-out register

Privacy First is surprised that no attention has been paid to the role of ‘sensitive personal details’ in transactional data. Such details may only be shared under strict conditions and therefore have to be filtered out. Equally, consumers who do not want others to share their data with financial service providers should have the opportunity to prevent this. That is why Privacy First would like to see an opt-out register, similar to the do-not-call-me register which has been around in the Netherlands for many years. During the Radar broadcast, Privacy First announced it would bring forward this proposal, hoping to be able to develop it further together with the financial sector and policy makers. The aim is to have a compulsory opt-out register. This will, however, require amending the European PSD2 directive.

[1] Additional information: it concerns all transactional data. The extent to which these data go back in time varies per bank. See the overview (in Dutch) of the Dutch consumer association: The majority of account holders saves their bank statements for at least five years https://www.consumentenbond.nl/betaalrekening/meerderheid-bewaart-rekeningafschriften-ten-minste-5-jaar.
[2] Additional information: this is included in Article 9 of the GDPR and in Article 22 of the Dutch GDPR implementation Act. In short, processing sensitive personal data is unlawful, with a few exceptions. See (in Dutch) https://wetten.overheid.nl/BWBR0040940/2018-05-25.

Tuesday, 03 July 2018 11:58

Privacy First Annual Report 2017

The Privacy First Foundation hereby publishes its 2017 annual report: click HEREpdf to download the pdf version. In our annual report you can read all about our main activities in 2017, including our court cases, our lobbying and our public events. Despite the recent renewal of European privacy law by the entry into force of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), the right to privacy in 2018 is under greater pressure than ever. A powerful organization like Privacy First therefore remains crucial and your support as a donor is indispensable. Click HERE to become a financial supporter of Privacy First!

Published in PR Downloads

During a Dutch press meeting about the new Payment Service Directive 2 (PSD2), an initiative to launch a privacy quality label for payment services was announced. This quality label should encourage financial service providers and fintech companies to focus on the privacy of consumers.

Volksbank

If you struggle to make ends meet, sooner or later you will get physical complaints, two Utrecht physicians wrote in Dutch newspaper AD/Utrechts Nieuwsblad of 7 March 2018. Those who want to lead a healthy life, will first have to make sure they’re in a healthy financial position. Being in control of your own finances and all related data is a part of that. De Volksbank offers a helping hand in both these areas.

The new European Payment Service Directive 2 (PSD2) paves the way for payment apps of new parties. Banks no longer have the exclusive right to offer payment services. This appears to be good news for consumers. But there is a downside too. Customers who share their data with any such new service provider, should take into account that part of those data are privacy-sensitive. A bank cannot recover such data once in the hands of other financial service providers, so the consumer cannot resort to anyone but himself if he regrets his decisions.

The Dutch Consumers' Association (Consumentenbond) has recently warned that personal data are already being collected on a large scale for commercial reasons. With the introduction of PSD2, this will only increase. Ninety days of access to personal information is sufficient for service providers to create digital profiles that can be traded. De Volksbank does not want to create profiles and is of the opinion that client information should be secure in the hands of the bank: ‘‘That means that we don’t sell information of clients, neither on an individual nor on an aggregated level. We earn our money as a bank, not by selling the data of our clients.'’

De Volksbank considers it to be its role of helping clients deal with their data in a secure and deliberate way in an environment that has changed. By providing information (free is never really free), but also by encouraging clients to take additional measures:

  • When it comes to taking deliberate decisions on sharing data, clients should increase their self-awareness by operating a Main Switch. The default setting of the Main Switch should be ‘off’. Before a client is able to authorize the bank to share his data with third parties, he should first flick the Main Switch. The client should then authorize the sharing of data for each party. In so doing, he can stop sharing his data with any party at any moment. Alternatively, he can flick the Main Switch, blocking the access to his data of all parties in a single instant.
  • In cooperation with De Volksbank, several other banks, KPMG and fintech companies, Privacy First is developing a PSD2 quality label. This should answer the call of the Central Bank of the Netherlands (DNB), which ascertained that as of yet there is no such quality label, while there is the need to have one. As far as we know, the Netherlands is the first country to be working on this issue. Thanks to the PSD2 quality label, consumers should at once be able to tell which parties they can or cannot entrust their data to. De Volksbank is working hard on further developing the quality label in order for it to be ready as soon as the Payment Service Directive 2 has been transposed into Dutch legislation.

Privacy First

The Privacy First Foundation supports the PSD2 privacy quality label. Privacy First would like it to become an international label which is recognized and supported by banks, fintech companies, financial service providers, regulators and consumer organizations.

PSD2 offers advantages, but also puts people’s privacy at risk. People are more than just consumers. Privacy First doubts whether the measures laid down in PSD2 to protect the data and therewith the privacy of people, will be sufficient. For the protection of personal data, PSD2 relies heavily on the new General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). This regulation has not yet come into force and we don’t know which effects PSD2 will have in practice and what the monitoring of it will look like. Many organizations are not yet ready to comply with all of the GDPR requirements. However, they will not hold off providing their services. In turn, regulators are not yet ready to enforce all aspects of the GDPR. Introducing PSD2 is like going out to fly without checking the parachute.

We hope that the quality label will encourage financial service providers and fintech companies to start considering consumers as human beings. We want the requirements of the label to be set higher each year. We also want service providers to consider the ‘information behind the information’:

  • The disclosure of behavior and data by others
  • Services with the underlying aim of collecting data (improper application)
  • Deducting data, such as transaction data from which sensitive personal data can be deduced.

We call on fintech companies to continue to explore ways to limit the amounts of data they collect and store. Think of excluding transaction data that could indicate religion, political preference or health status. Limiting the retention period of transaction data is another measure to take into consideration.


This article has also been published on privacy-web.nl.

IRMA and ‘referendum students’ win Dutch Privacy Awards

In the context of the National Privacy Conference organized by Privacy First and ECP, today the very first Dutch Privacy Awards have been awarded. These Awards offer a podium to companies and governments that consider privacy as an opportunity to positively distinguish themselves and want privacy-friendly entrepreneurship and innovation to become a benchmark. The great winner of the 2018 Dutch Privacy Awards is IRMA (I Reveal My Attributes). The students who organized the Dutch referendum about the controversial Tapping law received the incentive prize.

Winner: IRMA (I Reveal my Attributes)

IRMA (I Reveal my Attributes) is a state of the art, open source identity platform which allows users to authenticate themselves by using an app on the basis of one or several attributes related to their different roles (contextual authentication). This form of authentication does not reveal one’s identity: a one-to-one relation between the user and the service provider makes brokers redundant and allows the former to use services anonymously, without a password and with minimal attributes.

The system has been developed by the Digital Security Research Group of the Radboud University Nijmegen. Since the end of 2016, IRMA is part of the independent Dutch Privacy by Design foundation.

The Awards panel praises the academic community for developing IRMA as a general purpose privacy-by-design application intended for both the private as well as the public sector. As a means of privacy-friendly authentication, the panel regards the innovative capacity of the open source technology used, the instant deployability and the potential impact on society of IRMA as great assets. That is why the panel unanimously chose IRMA as the winner of the 2018 Dutch Privacy Awards.

Winners: ‘Tapping law students’

On the initiative of five University of Amsterdam students, a national referendum about the new and controversial Dutch Intelligence and Security Services Act (‘Tapping law’) will be held on 21 March 2018. Regardless of the outcome of the referendum, one of its results will be a heightened awareness of and a more critical stand towards privacy issues among the Dutch. This fact alone was sufficient ground for the panel to unanimously reward the students with a Dutch Privacy Award (incentive prize).

Nominations

There are four categories in which applicants are awarded:

1. the category of Consumer solutions (from companies for consumers)

2. the category of Business solutions (within a company or business-to-business)

3. the category of Public services (public authorities to citizens)

4. The incentive prize for a ground breaking technology or person.


Out of the various entries, the independent expert panel chose the following nominees per category:

Consumer solutions: Business solutions: Public services:
IRMA (I Reveal My Attributes) TrustTester Youth Privacy Implementation Plan (municipality of Amsterdam)
Schluss Personal Health Train  


During the National Privacy Conference the nominees have presented their projects to the audience in Award pitches. Thereafter, the Awards were handed out. Click HERE for the entire Award panel report (pdf in Dutch), which includes participation criteria and explanatory notes on all the nominees and winners.

NPC2018 043 web 1020px e

From left to right: Paul Korremans (panel member), Luca van der Kamp (‘referendum student’), Esther Bloemen (Personal Health Train), Nina Boelsums (‘referendum student’), Bas Filippini (panel chairman), Bart Jacobs (IRMA), Arjan van Diemen (TrustTester), Marie-José Hoefmans (Schluss) and Wilmar Hendriks (Youth Privacy Implementation Plan (municipality of Amsterdam). Photo: Maarten Tromp.

National Privacy Conference

The National Privacy Conference is an initiative of ECP (Dutch Platform for the Information Society) and Privacy First. From now on, the conference will bring together once a year Dutch industry, public authorities, the academic community and civil society with the aim to build a privacy-friendly information society. The mission of both the National Privacy Conference and Privacy First is to turn the Netherlands into a guiding nation in the field of privacy. To this end, privacy-by-design is key.

The speakers during the 2018 National Privacy Conference were, in successive order:

Aleid Wolfsen, chairman of the Dutch Data Protection Authority,
Gerrit-Jan Zwenne, professor of Law and the Information Society (University of Leiden),
Jaap-Henk Hoepman, associate professor Privacy by Design (Radboud University Nijmegen),

Ulco van de Pol, chairman of the Amsterdam Data Protection Commission,
Tim Toornvliet, Netherlands ICT,
Lennart Huizing, Privacy Company.

SPF ECP PC2018 01 1200px

Aleid Wolfsen, chairman of the Dutch Data Protection Authority. Photo: Maarten Tromp.

Panel of the Dutch Privacy Awards

The independent expert Award panel consists of privacy experts from different fields:
• Bas Filippini, founder and chairman of Privacy First (panel chairman)
• Paul Korremans, data protection & security professional at Comfort Information Architects
• Marie-José Bonthuis, owner of IT’s Privacy
• Bart van der Sloot, senior researcher at Tilburg University
• Marjolein Lanzing, PhD Philosophy & Ethics, Eindhoven University of Technology.

In order to make sure that the award process is run objectively, the panel members may not judge on any entry of his or her own organization.

Privacy First organized this first edition of the Dutch Privacy Awards in collaboration with ECP, with the support of the Democracy & Media Foundation and the Adessium Foundation. Would you like to become a partner of the Dutch Privacy Awards? Then please contact Privacy First!

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Published in Actions
Monday, 03 July 2017 16:09

Privacy First Annual Report 2016

The Privacy First Foundation hereby publishes its 2016 annual report (PDF filepdf), in which you can read everything about our main activities in 2016, including our court cases, our lobbying and our public events. The Privacy First organization currently finds itself in an important growth phase. As the significance of adequate privacy protection in our information society becomes ever greater and more urgent, the importance of a strong and powerful organization like Privacy First continues to rise correspondingly. Your support as a donor is and remains indispensable! Please consider becoming a Privacy First donor!

Published in PR Downloads
Wednesday, 15 June 2016 18:07

Privacy First Annual Report 2015

The Privacy First Foundation presents its 2015 Annual Report: click HERE to download the pdf version. In this report, you will read everything about Privacy First’s daily fight to preserve and promote everyone’s right to privacy. To be able to continue this fight, our organization largely depends on individual donors. The more donors, the more effectively Privacy First can operate by way of political lobbying, targeted actions, campaigns, public events and lawsuits. Click HERE to become a donor of Privacy First!

Published in PR Downloads
Sunday, 12 December 2010 19:04

Martijn van der Veen, Project leader

Martijn van der Veen, Project leader

Martijn van der Veen fullfills a project management role within Privacy First. Before, he fullfilled a pioneering role by raising Privacy First Solutions. With this initiative the Foundation aimed to address the business market. Martijn is the founder and owner of Procis, a network organization and consultancy firm specialized in privacy issues, ranging from Privacy Impact Assessments (PIAs) to the implementation of organizational changes. Having studied Public Administration at the University of Twente, throughout his career he has been active within civil society organizations and has worked on projects for the Dutch police, the Dutch Ministry of Security and Justice and other governments, both at national as well as municipal level.

Today, the handling of personal data and the integrity of information processing are among the bigger challenges faced by organizations and governments. In Martijn's vision it is possible to both achieve (policy) goals as well as to safeguard privacy. By committing himself to Privacy First as our project leader, he contributes to the necessary checks & balances within a democratic constitutional State.

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